Three Viable Ways To Reduce Your Liability

“Sustaining success is only possible if you’ve achieved it first.”
 
In business, personal relationships, or especially in official capacities, liability is THE single most crucial qualifier to a maintaining trust.  Sadly, it’s not so much as I what we do as much as it is how we are perceived in our pursuit of success.  This is a sad truth; a harsh reality; but a necessary consideration. 

Reducing liability is akin to being perceived as successful.  Banks do not give loans to businesses that don’t look successful on their business plan.  Suitors do not accept wedding proposals without believing their nuptials will be fruitful.  Nor should we select public officials who do not already have a successful network. 

Communication

We must be mindful of our words.  It’s very difficult to retract written statements.  It’s impossible for an associate to “unhear” a malicious or otherwise inappropriate comment. But we can think before we speak.  We can write a draft before we publish.  And we can collaborate before we put our own heads out in the chopping block.  Ensure that what you say is not harmful.   It is when we fail to do this, we are liable to damages, law suits, and substantial losses. That would be a major setback.  
 
No one is suggesting that we refrain from speaking though. However, Abraham Lincoln once said, “It’s better to be remain silent and thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.” Wise words not to be taken out of context.  Silence doesn’t not always meet our objective though.  Imagine having a question but never having the courage to ask it.  

  
Transparency 

So many entrepreneurs fail to have their ideas recognized because of their inability to develop a plan of action.  Whether it be a blueprint or a business plan, there needs to be a tangible work that can be demonstrated, displayed, and critiqued.  Put in the work!

“Faith without work is death!”   We can not wish success into existence.  To be successful we must develop our objective and convey our goal.  And then show up. 

Exposing the plan is not giving the secret away.  In fact, sharing the plan offers an opportunity for others to collaborate and offer support.  When they say that Rome was not built in a day, it must be understood that it was not built by an individual either.  Be willing to take the risk.  With hard work and tenacity, no one can steal your glory.  So show off a little!

We reduce our liability by rechecking our plan and consider the potentential for damage.  An plan that is 99% effective is still 1% likely to cause harm. Be aware!  Be careful. Plan better. 

Commitment

Commit to your goal.  Own it!  Waiver only when necessary, and avoid distractions at all cost.  There will be plenty of opportunity to abandon a goal for a better one.  And there’s nothing wrong with that.  But quitters never win.  That path that successful people take is not always the one least traveled.  But it is the one traveled by people who know where they are going. 

Do you know where you are going?  If not, revisit your plan.  Revise your plan. Ask for help.  When we fail to commit to our own plan, we are our own biggest risk.  Would you partner with someone who can’t commit to the plan?   Of course not.  Be the partner you wish to work with.  

Liability plays a huge role in achieving success because at any given moment in a business, personal, or official function we are offered an opportunity to communicate (or miscommunicate).  Transparency diminishes fear, wonder, or hostility because there are no secrets.  Not everyone will like the direction we are traveling, but atleast they will see our commitment. Our adversaries will always try to “throw shade” but that it merely evidence that we are on their minds.  When they are watching us succeed, it’s because we are in front of them.  Successful leaders, like ourselves, only look back to help others keep up.  

Success is not about meeting individual goals. It’s about collectively enriching the lives of those around us. Share these techniques with a colleague or friend. Each one CAN teach one.  

If you’d like to share a suggestion that helped you gain success by reducing your liability, leave a comment below.  Until we meet in the winners circle, thanks for reading!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s